Book Club!

I did a thing tonight— I created a Facebook group called The Not Quite Superhuman Book Club. The group is a place to talk about books. There is no monthly set reading list. Simply talk about the books that have you excited and you want to share with others. All books are created equal there.

Anyone can join. In fact, most of the first members work in libraries, so there are sure to be some great recommendations. Librarians are great people, but just in case, here are some Group Rules:

  1. As Captain America says “Language!”. Let’s keep it clean and respectful.
  2. While discourse about a book is encouraged, respect the opinions of others. We all have different reasons a book made a connection with us and not everyone will agree. That is okay!
  3. Book links from Amazon are okay, but don’t try selling your essential oils and Tupperware here…that will get you blocked.
  4. No politics…things go down the rabbit hole too quickly.
  5. No hate speech or bullying.

This group is a work in progress. If you have ideas or would like to help moderate, let us know! Happy reading and check out the group! We would love to see you there!

Click here to request an invite to join the group!

What I Read: Spring Edition

I know I have been promising an update on my latest reads and impressions, but honestly, I have not really been feeling it. That is not to say that everything has been wasted effort…I am half the way through interviews for my dissertation field research (transcribing, edits, and coding are a whole other story). That is, of course, awesome news considering that most of my field research time in the last six months have mainly been spent waiting. But hey, lots of reading can happen when you are waiting.

So what have I read?


Outer Order, Inner Calm in many ways reminded me of reading a blog about organizing. The sections were short and sounded very personal, almost conversational. A lot of what Rubin had to say has been said by many other authors before her, but I found myself energized after reading the book. In fact, when I finished it, I was a little shocked and wanting to know more. My Easter plans consist of doing a little organizing and there will be no discussion on if something brought me joy but rather does this thing still hold value to me. At least that is what I got out of the book and Rubin does mention Kondo and Morgenstern as other resources to consider when it comes to organizing. I like it when an author acknowledges stuff like that.


I will fully admit that I like the arranged marriage trope and all the subsets like mail-order brides…in fiction, not real life. I am not saying that it is a practice that should still be followed, but imagine the courage these women must have had to leave everything they knew to marry a stranger. You definitely need faith in who your future spouse says they are cause it might turn out that they are on the run from the law which is the case with Saving the Mail Order Bride. I really wanted to like this story. It started out great with the outlaw and the bride ending up on the same stagecoach and not realizing at first who the other is…but then it turned out not so great. Really, how many times can you put your protagonist in danger and have him come out alive? I really feel like the author said “Challenge Accepted”. The poor man was tossed from a stagecoach, shot, bit by a snake…


Okay, meet cute stories are my second guilty pleasure. So the title and cover of Meet Cute caught my interest right away. Then the storyline of a celebrity crush meeting not once but twice. I loved the book! Plus there was the whole family angle to put another dynamic on it. There was only one part of the book that I did not like and that was the conference scene. I felt like Kailyn was being a little selfish and insensitive to Dax. It just felt off compared to the rest of the book. Other than that I would highly recommend it.


I feel like this one has been mentioned before, but I couldn’t find a post for it. Full disclosure, I read this one months ago. However, I have put it on the list because I overheard a friend say that she was tired of reading about women falling in love with rich men or the dashing hero, that she wanted to read a story of a woman who fell in love with a bum. Well, this is a story of a woman who fell in love with a bum. My third guilty pleasure read (and probably my favorite), the “let’s pretend we are together” storyline. In Marry Me Tomorrow, Emily has basically created a Bunbury husband in that she told her mother she got married to stop the discussion of when was she ever going to settle down. Her mother lived in the states and she in England, so no problem on keeping the truth hidden…until her mom says she is coming to visit and expects to meet the new spouse. So Emily asks one of the homeless men she sees on her morning commute to pretend to be her spouse. The story has some dark moments and tackles some mental health and societal problems. Sam was just such a nice guy who got dealt a raw deal. You will be rooting for him!


I really wanted to like No Other Duke But You. The Amazon description does not do it justice because that description is only a small part of the story. What the book is really about is two friends, one who says he is not ready for marriage and the other who is too busy matchmaking to focus on her own love life. What made me cringe was how obviously friendzoned the guy was and how he manipulates the girl into realizing that they are perfect together. Normally, I like the stories where the guy and girl realize they are more than best friends, but this was not it. As I write this, I actually had a flashback to one of the prequel Star Wars movies where Anakin is *maybe* unconsciously using the force to get Padme to love him.


Say No to the Duke was the third book in a series, the Wildes of Lindow Castle by the fabulous Eloisa James. Each book gave you a glimpse into the relationship that would be highlighted in the next book and I have to admit that I could not wait to read what would happen after the billiards game in book two. I am honestly not sure how to give my opinion on this one without giving you a spoiler. At the end of book two, there is a billiards game that may result in a compromising situation, no matter who won. If the woman won, then she got a London adventure in men’s apparel. If the man won, then he won a night with the woman with no marriage attached. All I will say is that the person who I wanted to win, did win, but I did not like the outcome of that win. Okay, the theme here is storyline tropes that I like and the next one is when a woman (or even the guy) has to disguises their identity. I really like the genderswap stories a la Shakespeare and as a Shakespeare scholar, I was looking forward to how James handled that plot. And that is all I am going to say about that.

If you click on any of the links I have provided, you will be taken to Amazon where you will see a more detailed description of the books listed here. Hey, these are just my opinions and you might love the books I found issue with. It happens. My husband thought Hunger Games was an awesome book and I thought Katniss was a horrible person. To each their own. Happy Reading!

What I Read: November & December

I know, I promised you that I would have a post up with my current reading list and thoughts…Well, hey, it is still December, right? So here is a combined post of what I have read over the past two months. If you want to read summaries of what the book is about, then head over to the Amazon link (if you buy the book, I get a small portion of the sale through my affiliate link). These are my thoughts after reading the books. Enjoy!Read More »

What I Read

Woah has it been a busy couple of weeks! I finally heard back from IRB that changes were needed on my dissertation proposal before the university would allow me to start my research. However, there was a deadline attached or I would have to start all over again with the application process which means another two months of waiting. Add to that, my teaching for my STEM in Libraries course was wrapping up which meant a mad dash to get all my grading done by the semester deadline. We took a week off for a mini vacation at my mother in laws…or what I affectionately call “Where Internet Goes to Die”. So nothing was getting done there like I had planned and it was hard for me to unwind knowing what I had waiting for me back home. But that is all behind me now! Everything has been caught up which means I can focus on writing again.

One of my previous posts was about self care and being a librarian I realized I neglected to add something to the list: Reading! In the past three weeks, I have been reading some books due out for publication soon. So I thought I would give a breakdown of what I read and my thoughts. Enjoy!Read More »

Browsing the Shelves

This has been a slow couple of days for me in terms of creativity. We didn’t go anywhere for Thanksgiving and dinner was pretty much an open the box or bag and dump it in kind of meal. I wasn’t really feeling the inspiration. Then my husband ended up getting sick. My son didn’t feel good the next day, so I threw out our Turkey leftovers thinking it could be the possible culprit. Yesterday, I found out that there is a stomach bug going around the county, so maybe not a fowl culprit after all. Though I still wasn’t feeling the spirit to get much done. I did my shopping online as part of early-bird sales for cardholders for two stores. My son needed new sneakers, so we did brave one store during the late mornings on Thursday. The lines were still pretty long even at 11am.

Shopping this year has had me thinking about what shopping used to be like, not just for Black Friday, but in general. Where I live now does not have a major chain bookstore. We have a small independent shop that has some new books, but mostly they are used books. Today, I received a newsletter email from a learning professional discussing his recent trip to a bookstore in NYC. It was one of those brick and mortar stores that Amazon has been opening in major cities. The books on the shelf are determined by the popular items sold in the online store and then a group of very similar curated titles that the algorithm thinks the reader might also be interested in. Pretty cool idea, but it had me thinking back to bookstores when I was a kid.

When I was much much younger, it used to be a thrill to take my allowance, then later my paycheck, to the bookstore at the two malls I frequented: Waldens and Barnes & Noble. As a teenager, the only reason I went to malls was either for the movies or for the bookstore. Many times it was both. I could usually convince my dad to go with me to the movies if it included a stop at the bookstore. He was my partner in crime and would usually give extra money for books.

While the bookstores of my youth were chain bookstores, they held just as much magic for me as the independent stores that people still mourn today. So many choices and so many worlds to explore. My go-to sections were always the Historical Romances and the Sci-Fi/Fantasy sections. I never left the store without at least four paperbacks in hand. Many of my favorite authors were discovered through browsing the shelves for hours before I decided how my money would be spent that day. There were no smartphones to allow for “showrooming” by adding books to a virtual cart for purchase later (or at a cheaper price) while browsing a physical space. If I really wanted something, I had to get it there. One of my favorite authors today is Tamora Pierce and I happened on her books by chance because one had been misshelved and I saw it while looking for something else.

I have several booklists now of to-be-read items both on Amazon and through my local library’s website, but browsing through a virtual list is not the same as browsing the physical shelves. It is not the same at the used bookstores or the library either because while there are plenty of treasures, these are not always new books. Plus, today we read reviews from other readers or blog posts before we purchase. There are even media campaigns against certain authors even before their books are published. Our choices are shaped by the input of others. Our discovery has been hampered by the information available to us.

I think this year, I might take my son to one of the malls a couple of hours away just so he can browse the shelves at the bookstore and find a treasure of his own. No starred reviews, no comments from teachers about what is on his reading level, no feedback from strangers about why no one should read the book or why everyone should read the book. Just discovery and enjoyment.